Columns/Opinions

Thu
15
Nov

Western artist Remington visited Texas often

Texas History

The Evening Tribune took note of the presence of Frederic Remington in El Paso in a brief announcement on Nov. 19, 1893. The renowned artist was such a frequent visitor to Texas’ westernmost town that the editor saw no reason to make a big deal of another appearance.

Proving roots need not dictate destiny, the painter who gave stayat-home Americans their first true glimpse of the Southwest grew up in northern New York state. He enrolled in Yale at age 16 to please a demanding father but dropped out as soon as he died.

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Thu
15
Nov

Election results reveal larger than usual turnout

AUSTIN — More than 8.3 million of Texas' 15.8 million registered voters cast ballots in the Nov. 6 general election, as shown in results posted by the secretary of state.

The turnout of almost 53 percent was recognized widely as the highest in nearly 50 years for a Texas election without presidential candidates on the ballot.

U.S. Rep. Robert Francis “Beto” O’Rourke, D-El Paso, garnered national attention in his quest to unseat U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Houston, but Cruz won the race with 4,244,204 votes (50.92 percent) to 4,024,777 (48.29 percent) for O’Rourke.

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Thu
08
Nov

“Open Forum” opened minds in Houston, Dallas

By Bartee Haile

 

As part of the popular “Open Forum” in Houston, Margaret Sanger spoke on “The Need For Birth Control In America” to an audience of 2,500 in the city auditorium on Nov. 7, 1931. While six different Texas cities held regular public lectures by wellknown guest speakers in the early twentieth century, the “Open Forum” programs with the most staying power were in Dallas and Houston. And in both cases single individuals determined to broaden the intellectual and cultural horizons of their communities were responsible for the creation and survival of the civic institutions. In Big D that person was Elmer Scott. The Ohio native was fresh out of college in 1889, when a fraternity brother hired him as an assistant for the new office his company was opening in Dallas. The midwesterner liked the people and the city, which had a population of 65,000 at the time, and made a promise to himself that someday he would return.

 

 

Thu
01
Nov

Texas receives grant to help fund anti-terrorism measures

By Ed Sterling

 

AUSTIN — Gov. Greg Abbott on Oct. 24 announced $55.5 million in funding from the federal Homeland Security Grant Program to support state and local efforts to prevent terror attacks and crack down on terroristic activity in Texas.

 

These awards, according to a governor’s office news release, will go toward local anti-terrorism efforts across the state, including 227 different State Homeland Security Program projects and 134 Urban Area Security Initiative projects.

 

"Texas is confronted with a wide range of threats that pose a risk to our safety and security each day, and as governor, my first priority is to ensure the safety and security of all Texans. These grants will enhance state and local officials' efforts to not only confront, but also prepare for and prevent, attacks before they happen," Abbott said.

 

Thu
01
Nov

American volunteers fight to liberate Texas

By Bartee Haile

 

The Republican Army of the North, a motley crew of American adventurers and Mexican rebels, reached La Bahia on Nov. 1, 1812 and made themselves right at home in the empty fortress.

 

When Jose Bernardo Gutierrez de Lara hurried off to Washington, D.C. in March 1811, the Mexican revolt against the Spaniards was treading water. As he begged the U.S. government for desperately needed aid, his compatriots went down for the final time.

 

But Don Bernardo refused to call it quits and resolved to foment another rebellion. Learning from the fatal mistakes of his dead predecessors, he chose a more favorable site, the poorly guarded province of Texas, and more experienced fighters, the outcasts and outlaws of the Neutral Ground.

 

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Thu
25
Oct

Cooking chili in Terlingua, a Texas tradition

By Bartee Haile

It took three days to clean the pots, haul away the mountain of beer cans and sober up the last of the revelers, but by Oct. 24, 1967 everything was back to normal in the Big Bend ghost town.

The Terlingua Chili Cook-Off had been a rousing success, but no one thought at the time that they had started an annual shindig that would become a Texas tradition.

 

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Thu
25
Oct

Disaster declaration affects counties hit by heavy rains and flooding

By Ed Sterling

AUSTIN — Gov. Greg Abbott issued a state disaster declaration for 18 Texas counties recently impacted by deadly weather that claimed at least four lives and caused extensive flooding.

On Oct. 16 Abbott authorized the use of all available resources of state government and of political subdivisions to aid in response efforts.

 

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Thu
18
Oct

Panel hears about what’s being done to ‘harden’ school campuses

By Ed Sterling

 

AUSTIN — The Texas House Committee on Appropriations met Oct. 9 to hear ideas on improving school safety in the aftermath of the May 18 Santa Fe High School shooting that left eight students and two teachers dead and 13 injured.

 

“It’s an unbelievable reality that shootings in schools are occurring more frequently,” said state Rep. John Zerwas, chairman of the powerful, state budget-writing committee. “As a Legislature we must do what we can to ensure our schools are places of learning and not places of fear.”

 

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Thu
18
Oct

Texans elect “sick man of senate” to fourth term

By Bartee Haile

 

With Election Day just two weeks away, Sen. Charles Culberson spent Oct. 21, 1916 doing what he did best -- nothing. Why bother campaigning when a fourth term was already in the bag?

 

Looking for an appealing replacement for Gov. Jim Hogg in 1895, power broker E.M. House picked the handsome attorney general. Although his glaring lack of principles moved one politician to observe that 40 year old Charlie Culberson “would be all right if he had a little more iron down his backbone,” Colonel House considered the shortcoming an asset rather than a liability.

 

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Thu
11
Oct

Gambler gives Texans tour of Kansas cowtown

By Randall Luker

The Lady Pirate varsity volleyball team swept the Lady Bulldogs of Nederland 3- 0 at Pirate Gym Tuesday. Scores were 25- 21, 25-18, 25-23 for a 3-0 victory over their district rival. Leading the Lady Pirates to victory were Reagan Castilaw with 12 kills, 1 ace, 2 blocks and10 digs; Brooklyn Healy with 11 kills, 2 assists and 20 digs; Mallory Chilton with 10 kills, 3 blocks and 13 digs; Shalyn Bobbitt with 9 kills, 1 assist, 1 block and 3 digs; Julian Sanford with 2 kills, 30 assists, 2 aces and 19 digs; Kiley Brown with 3 assists, 2 aces, 13 digs and Jaci Mathews with 3 aces

 

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