Columns/Opinions

Thu
01
Sep

D.A. Henderson and the triumph of science

At a time when Hillary Clinton gets applause by declaring, “I believe in science,” it’s worth taking a moment to remember the life and achievements of Donald Ainslee Henderson. All he did with science was eradicate smallpox. Dr. Henderson died Friday at age 87 in Towson, Md., not far from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, where he had been dean emeritus. In the early 1960s, while working for the Centers for Disease Control, he and his team began an ambitious program to eliminate smallpox in 18 African countries. 
 
 
Thu
01
Sep

Tap-dancing teenager knocked ’em dead

By Bartee Haile 
 
 
In a Sep. 2, 1939 review of George White’s “Scandals of 1939,” a Broadway critic reserved his highest praise for a teenager from Texas named Ann Miller, who stopped the show every night with her high-energy tap dance. The future fixture of Hollywood musicals in the 1930’s and 1940’s was born Lucille Ann Collier at her grandparent’s place near Nacogdoches. The year was 1923, and that is important because she would later change it to find work in Tinsel Town.  
 
Thu
25
Aug

Diplomat defies own government to end Mexican War

By Bartee Haile

 

A lowly state department functionary, whose only claim to fame was his marriage to Thomas Jefferson’s granddaughter, opened negotiations with Mexico on Aug. 27, 1847 to finally bring an end to the war that had dragged on long enough. By February 1847, the Mexicans’ intransigence was giving President James K. Polk fits. Though badly beaten in every battle, the hopelessly outclassed opponent refused to concede defeat and showed not the slightest interest in stopping the carnage.  

 

Thu
25
Aug

Texan diagnosed with Zika after returning from trip

By Ed Sterling

 

AUSTIN — A Texas resident who recently traveled to Miami, Florida, has tested positive for Zika virus disease, the Texas Department of State Health Services reported on Aug. 15. The traveler, an El Paso County resident, sought testing after becoming ill. This is the first Texas case to be linked to travel within the continental United States. The case will be classified as “travel-associated” and is being investigated for more details, the DSHS said.

 

Thu
18
Aug

Court relaxes Texas voter ID law in time for fall election

By Ed Sterling
 
Thu
18
Aug

Alamo movies often not worth ticket price

By Bartee Haile
 
Thu
11
Aug

Parties to campus-carry lawsuit to return to court

By Ed Sterling
 
AUSTIN — Three University of Texas professors are seeking a temporary injunction “to at least retain the option of maintaining their academic classrooms as gun-free zones when classes start again.” In a motion filed in connection with a federal lawsuit filed July 6, the professors are asking the court to bar enforcement of the law when the UT fall semester begins Aug. 24. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton filed a brief in opposition. 
 
Thu
11
Aug

Texans elect closet klansman U.S. Senator

By Bartee Haile
 
On Aug. 16, 1922, prohibitionist Cullen F. Thomas, eliminated in the first round of voting for a seat in the United States Senate, endorsed front-runner Earle B. Mayfield, the Klan candidate, in the upcoming runoff. Alcoholism and Bright’s disease earned Charles A. Culberson the derisive nickname “the sick old man of the Senate.” Nevertheless, the four-term incumbent was determined to die on the job and announced he would stand for reelection in 1922. 
 
Thu
04
Aug

State rolls out revised women’s health program

By Ed Sterling

AUSTIN — A women's health program is in effect and ready to deliver more care to more women statewide who are 15 to 44 years old and whose income is up to 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines. Sen. Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound, and Texas Health and Human Services Executive Commissioner Charles Smith, in a joint announcement on July 25, said they expect the “new and improved” Healthy Texas Women program to serve some 300,000 women, while earlier programs served 270,000 women. Participation for minors will require parental consent.  

 

Thu
04
Aug

Congress vs. Liberty

From ballooning national debt and spending on the Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid entitlement programs, to the thousands of regulations imposed each year on efforts to strip Americans' gun rights, to enhanced spying on American citizens through the National Security Agency and others, government continues to grow and become more intrusive in our lives. So where are the proliberty legislators trying to protect us from these depredations? 

 

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