Bay boats just keep getting longer

Bay boats just keep getting longer

Just when I thought that the size of bay boats had reached a maximum practical size they seem to just keep getting longer. While waiting at the Causeway landing for my crew this past Saturday morning, a young friend of mine pulled up with a new twenty-six-footer. I can’t remember the brand name of the boat but it was a cat or twin hulled low-profile fishing boat with a flat deck connecting the two hulls. In the middle of what seemed like an acre of casting deck, both on bow and stern there was a small, self-bailing cockpit area where the center console sat with two of the finest padded captains’ chairs, I have ever seen. The hull contours of this boat showed that someone had done some incredible engineering and from my experience it looked as if it would take the waves really well. In a boat of this length the ride would have to be good because the bow would be in the next wave well before the stern left the last one. This unusual looking boat had every imaginable gadget to aid in fishing and was powered by a huge 350 hp. outboard. Standing there beside this boat, my mind began to wander about the details of owning such a beast of a fishing boat. How much fuel does this thing burn? How difficult is it to tow and what size truck would it take to handle it? How big would your boat shed have to be to accommodate it; you obviously couldn’t leave a boat like that out in the weather? How wide does the entrance of your driveway have to be so that you can turn in without dropping your trailer wheels in the ditch. The words to that old country song began to play in my mind, “Some guys can do it on a dime or do it right down town but I need forty acres to turn this rig around”.

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