When to run and when to stay put

When to run and when to stay put

We watched as the sun rose out of the Louisiana marsh like a huge ball of fire. There were no clouds anywhere in the sky this past Friday morning so nothing was obstructing our view. It is amazing how fast the sun seems to move when you view it against the horizon. We were sitting on a small shell reef just north of the Causeway Bridge, which separates Texas from Louisiana, facing east across the marsh. As cool as the sunrise was, it didn’t take long before it was uncomfortable to look at it so our focus came back on the task at hand; catching speckled trout, red fish and flounder. As yet, we did not have one of either in the boat. There were small bait fish moving through and across the reef on the outgoing tide but there were no gamefish to disturb their movement. Whenever I pull up on a reef that is small enough to almost cast across it, I expect to get a fish to grab on to my lure within ten or so casts. It might work out to hang and wait and see if anyone comes through but that is against my nature. I instructed my two-man crew to secure their lures, rack their rods in the stand-up rod tubes and get ready to roll. In about one minute we were on plane and gone. Sabine Lake was calm on this morning, something we have seen very little of in the last few weeks so having the option of a calm boat ride allowed us to take an up-lake run to the fabled North Levy Wall. It is a pretty good trip from the Causeway Bridge to the North levy but one of my guide friends had been up there the previous day and had good success on specks. Knowing the fish are there is at least half of the battle so I pointed my Pathfinder north.

 

 

 

 

 

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